The leading knowledge platform for the financial technology industry
The leading knowledge platform for the financial technology industry

A-Team Insight Blogs

US Regulators Pushing for Increased Pricing Transparency Around CDSs

US regulators have this week been highlighting the need for more transparency around OTC derivatives pricing, in particular around credit default swaps (CDS), which are now moving towards being centrally cleared in the market. Speaking in New York at an International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA) conference, Theo Lubke, senior vice-president at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, told delegates that the CDS market must act as a benchmark for other OTC markets with regards to pricing transparency.

The Fed uses CDS prices as a benchmark to assess market and credit risk, explained Lubke, and this means that transparency is of systemic importance in this space. He reckons a lot more needs to be done to improve transparency around the pricing of these instruments and soon: “The more CDS is used as a reference tool, the more important it is that market participants understand the pricing process.”

Moving CDSs and other OTC derivatives onto central clearing counterparties (CCPs), as suggested by the Obama administration’s regulatory overhaul proposals, is likely to improve pricing transparency to some extent. Indices on CDSs have already begun to be cleared by the CCPs currently operating in the market and this has indeed meant that pricing for these has been made publicly available. However, clearing on these CCPs has not yet been mandated by Congress and it will take regulatory approval for this to happen on a wider scale.

The goal of the regulators may be to mitigate counterparty risk in the OTC derivatives market but a side effect will be institutionalising pricing sources. Pricing feeds that are employed by the various CCPs will therefore give certain data providers the edge over others, although the need for financial institutions to provide best price to their clients will also add to the valuations data cause.

Congress is due to vote on these measures before the end of the year and the valuations vendor community will have to wait until then before it can judge the full impact of regulation on the space.

Related content

WEBINAR

Recorded Webinar: The post-Brexit UK sanctions regime – how to stay safe and compliant

When the Brexit transition period came to an end on 31 December 2020, a new sanctions regime was introduced in the UK under legislation set out in the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 (aka the Sanctions Act). The regime is fundamentally different to that of the EU, requiring financial institutions to rethink their response...

BLOG

One Year On: Banks Resume Prioritization of FRTB, but Same Challenges Persist

By: Essan Soobratty, Regulatory Product Manager, and Eugene Stern, Head of Market Risk Product, Bloomberg. One year on from the start of the global pandemic which sent global markets into turmoil and prompted regulators to introduce a range of emergency measures to support the financial system and the broader economy, banks are continuing their return...

EVENT

RegTech Summit APAC Virtual

RegTech Summit APAC will explore the current regulatory environment in Asia Pacific, the impact of COVID on the RegTech industry and the extent to which the pandemic has acted a catalyst for RegTech adoption in financial markets.

GUIDE

Entity Data Management Handbook – Seventh Edition

Sourcing entity data and ensuring efficient and effective entity data management is a challenge for many financial institutions as volumes of data rise, more regulations require entity data in reporting, and the fight again financial crime is escalated by bad actors using increasingly sophisticated techniques to attack processes and systems. That said, based on best...